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The Reunion by John Cheever

Charlie’s Postcard

I chose to use a postcard format because I believe postcards excel at capturing a moment in time, are able to express emotion, and set a scene using only a picture and a brief dialogue. Another reason I chose to use a postcard was to illustrate the extreme shift in opinion that would have undoubtedly occurred before and after Charlie met up with his father.

The postcard expresses extreme optimism and a son who is truly eager to meet his father for the first time since his mom divorced him. “I wish that we could be photographed. I wanted some record of our having been together” Charlie said early on in the story (45). This is of course, before Charlie learns his father’s true nature. This exerpt clearly expresses the hopefulness and joy the reunion had brought Charlie in his first moments with his estranged father.

Whereas upon meeting up and crawling between restaurants, failing to actually eat any lunch but succeeding in making a lot of people’s days worse, Cheever expresses Charlie’s disappointment with the final line of the story: “‘Goodbye, Daddy,’ … and that was the last time I saw my father” (45). Leaving the story off on this bleak note solidifies the notion that Charlie is disappointed with the encounter with his father and goes as far to say that he never even bothers to see his father again, let alone write him another postcard.

Works Cited

Cheever, John. The Reunion. New York: New Yorker, 1962. PDF. The Reunion PDF

Webster, Ed. Patrick Subway Station. 3 Feb. 2012. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia. Web.     15 Feb. 2017 <https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Partick_subway_station_train_interior.jpg&gt;

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